Connect with us

Real Estate Brokerage

How to stop over-analyzing at work, use the 10% rule

(BROKERAGE) Avoid over-analyzing at work with this rule of thumb so that you can get back to business.

Published

on

productivity to do list %

Where to begin

Just do it. Nike’s words come so easily yet they are the hardest step to take. You have to start somewhere. There are an endless number of motivational and slightly overbearing phrases to mull over. There are so many in fact, that they may just prevent you from starting at all.

bar
That is the problem. Most of us find it difficult to dig ourselves out of the rabbit hole of over-analyzation. We spend so much time thinking about the thing, planning, getting advice, making spreadsheets and pretending to research that we never actually do the thing. We never start.

Self-aware

The good thing is that recognizing this about yourself is the first step to taking action. Think about the last project you had and review your timeline.

How much time was spent planning the project versus working on the project?

Sometimes people get so lost in building the systems they need to complete something, that they forget about the point of it all. This can happen because you still feel productive by answering all the questions you have and going over every detail to ensure perfection.

All of this planning eventually becomes an excuse not to begin.

If this sounds familiar, you are not alone. Luckily there is a pretty handy metric you can use in order to break yourself from this habit.

Actually do the work

Neil Hughes touched on the “10% rule” in his article which offers advice on how to stop over-analyzing projects. According to him, a good rule of thumb is that “no more than 10% of your time should be spent making systems; 90% should be spent using those systems.”

This refers to all of the list-making, research, and color-coded excel sheets that apparently are necessary to the project’s success. This is just an example ratio. Perhaps, you need at least 25% of your time to plan.

The main focus should be working on the project.

The best way to find what works is to review how you spent time on projects in the past.

Just a tool

How long did they take you to complete? Where can your time be better spent? By answering these questions, you can begin to steer yourself onto the path of action.

Planning can be a key tool in the success of a project, but remember that it is just a tool.

#10PercentRule

Natalie is a Staff Writer at The Real Daily and co-founded an Austin creative magazine called Almost Real Things. When she is not writing, she spends her time making art, teaching painting classes and confusing people. In addition to pursuing a writing career, Natalie plans on getting her MFA to become a Professor of Fine Art.

Real Estate Brokerage

Mental health resources for real estate practitioners (free or inexpensive options)

Mental health issues are often untreated when no insurance or few resources are apparent, but there are many resources available to keep the entire team cared for.

Published

on

obama harp program

There’s no shame in needing a doctor when you’re physically sick, but sometimes people think that mental illness should be hidden. No one likes to admit they’re struggling with an addiction, grief, or depression, but trust me, friends, family, and co-workers most likely know you’re struggling – they just may not know how to help.

Mental health assistance can be very expensive, especially without insurance. With the ACA, more people have access to services, but it may not be immediately evident.

Attention Brokers:

We recommend sharing this article with your team accompanied with a note explaining why. We’ve known many agents that suffer through drug addiction, unmedicated bipolar disorder, sex addiction, depression, and so forth. Open the door to a conversation. Everyone on the team deserves to be cared for, with or without insurance.

Free or inexpensive ways to get help:

If you or someone you know is in need of help or someone to listen to you, please do not be embarrassed. If you (or the person you’re concerned with) don’t have insurance or have limited resources, here are some places to get help.

  • If you are in a crisis, dial 911 or call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) for a 24-hour crisis center.
  • Check with your insurance company. You may not realize that you have mental health benefits, or understand how to find a provider that fits into your plan.
  • Talk to your primary care doctor. Your doctor may know of local resources that are available to you.
  • Most communities have local mental health centers that provide income-based services. Ask about discounts or reduced rates.
  • Dial 2-1-1 in Texas (and most states) for referrals to agencies that are in your community.
  • Go to your religious organization. Spiritual leaders are often willing to listen and help you get back on track. They may be able to direct you to resources within their community and network.
  • Search for your particular issue. The Anxiety and Depression Association of America (adaa.org) has a full list of resources and help for dealing with every day and chronic stress and worry. If you get too many hits, try using the phrase, “national foundation” then the issue, for example, “national foundation OCD.”
  • Go to the library and seek out a book. Self-help books on grief or depression can help you navigate your own feelings and find a way out.
  • Go to the App Store. Type in what you need help with. You might be surprised at what comes up. Happify is a good app that helps you work on being positive. 7 Cups of Tea offers trained listeners to get you through anxiety.
  • Talk to a friend, a trusted mentor, or family member. Reach out for help.
  • Exercise. Get out of your rut.

The bottom line is that whether you’re struggling or trying to help someone else who is, neither of you are alone. It may take more than one try, but we urge everyone to bookmark this page for reference, should it be needed now or int he future.

This story originally ran on September 2, 2015.

Continue Reading

Real Estate Brokerage

Why clearly expressing your business culture is so critical

(PROFESSIONALISM) Many of us claim to be cultured individuals, but are we business cultured? Let’s discuss.

Published

on

business culture

I like to think that I know a thing or two about vocabulary and its application to everyday life. However, I will admit, there have been times where I’ve thrown around a word or a phrase without being 100 percent sure of its meaning.

This typically happens with broad phrases, and we’re all guilty of it. But, what’s cool about language(s) is that it’s virtually limitless, so there’s always room to learn something new.

I’m sure you’re thinking, “okay, Taylor, that’s great and probably not as profound as you think it is. What does this have to do with business?”

Well, one of the phrases I’ve heard people throw around and not actually have it stick is “business culture.” It’s used broadly as a cliche with little meaning behind it, often used incorrectly.

While it’s easy to correctly define such a phrase, it is so general that it is difficult for some to have a true grasp of its meaning. Whenever I’m unclear on something, I go to the smartest person I know for clarity – my father.

My dad, Mike Leddin, is the executive director of a law firm in Chicago. Throughout my life, he’s been my go-to person for advice and explanation, and this was no different when I was seeking the root meaning of business culture.

Since he has a tendency to be more eloquent than I, let’s have him weigh in…

“The business culture within a company is as critically important as the products/services that are produced,” said Mike Leddin. “Creating the right culture, one that fosters teamwork and encourages contributions, thoughts, and ideas at all levels, will be ultimately reflected in the end product/service.”

He added, “The business culture should clearly reflect the social and ethical responsibility of the company, including management’s commitment to act responsible in all ways. Properly communicated Mission and Values Statements both internally and externally, will not only define the goal and objections of the organization, but also the manner in which these be will be sought and achieved.”

What stuck with me most was his conclusion:

“Business culture is not simply a statement or goal, it is the result of the manner in which we act each day.”

This idea of business culture is important for every team member to keep in mind as we walk into work each day. Questions such as: “What am I providing people?” and “Why should they trust me?” should factor into your definition of business culture.

A company is only as strong as its morals and values. Make sure yours has one that you believe in, lest you be just another brokerage in a sea of competitors that don’t lack clarity.

Continue Reading

Real Estate Brokerage

Why real estate brokerages are not startups

(REAL ESTATE) Brokerages are popping up nationwide that are sleek and modern, and also misinformed as they call themselves startups. Let’s talk about the technical definition.

Published

on

real estate startup

Businesses that are just starting out often refer to themselves as startups (which is inappropriate given that startups are funded differently, scale differently, and have completely different KPIs). Take real estate brokerages, for example. An increasing number call themselves startups, but when you look at the definition of a startup, can you really call yourself one?

Small businesses and startups have very different definitions (and there’s no shame in being a small business or an “innovative brokerage”). Let’s discuss.

1. Startups have a different goal altogether.

Typically, startups are about growth. They’re designed from day one to scale extremely quickly. Small businesses are often limited by a target market or geographic location. There’s nothing wrong with that, but they aren’t scalable the same way an international software brand is. Think about scaling in terms of a beauty salon versus MatchCo, an app that uses technology to create a foundation just for you. A franchise does not a startup make.

2. Startups generally seek outside funding to accelerate growth.

Startup founders often give up equity shares to generate funds before becoming profitable. Small businesses are typically self-funded, bootstrapped into profitability, and owned by one or a select few. A small business venture is typically less risky than a startup, too. The idea behind a small business venture is profit, and you want the business to last. Startups are structured to be sold or acquired once it hits critical mass – a “startup” is temporary.

3. Startups disrupt the industry.

Think about these companies – AirBnB, Google, Dropbox, Facebook, even Apple, a long time ago. In their early days, they were startups. It was risky to invest in these companies as they were trying something new (not iterating on something like the real estate practice which is one of the oldest professions in America), but they have outshone their competitors. They disrupted the marketplace. That’s what a startup does. And it doesn’t always work. Sonitus Medical attempted to disrupt the hearing aid market. They raised almost $90 million in funding before the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services decided the product wouldn’t be covered. The company held an auction and closed its doors. Brokerages have experimented with paying salaries, going paperless, or having all agents working remotely – these are all fabulous innovations and iterations, not disruptions.

The takeaway

We’ve been on the forefront for over a decade of ushering in the era of indie brokerages, paperless real estate brands, and counter-culture companies, but brokerages are simply not startups, and this is not up for debate. Iteration is not innovation.

Don’t call yourself something you’re not – be an “innovative broker” and rock it, because you’re not a temporary company seeking to scale so rapidly that you’re acquired for your indisputable disruption.

And finally, don’t fall for real estate brokerages pitching themselves as “startups” when they’re misinformed and really mean they’re simply, and beautifully “modern.”

Continue Reading

Emerging Stories

shares

Get The Real Daily
in your inbox

subscribe and get news and EXCLUSIVE content to your email inbox