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Zillow opens floodgates for new type of investment dollars into the brand

(BUSINESS NEWS) Zillow has opened up a new way to raise funds for the massive real estate brand, allowing their growth to continue accelerating.

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Zillow says yes to new money

Zillow Group, Inc., a leading provider of real estate information to consumers and a connector between the customer and real estate professional, stated their intention to offer up to $400 million dollars in Convertible Senior Notes due 2021, subject to market and other conditions.

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In addition, Zillow Group intends to offer the initial purchaser of the Convertible Notes a 30-day option to purchase up to an additional $60 million dollar aggregate principal amount of Convertible Notes to cover over-allotments.

This move will allow the company to raise capital from institutional investors now, while at the same time providing investors with access to Class C capital stock shares of Zillow, cash, or a combination of the two at Zillow Group’s choice.

While maturing in 2021, the notes will be able to be converted at the note holder’s option during undefined “certain circumstances” at “certain periods”. Interest will be paid in arrears, semi-annually. The structure of the sale limits the purchasers to qualified institutional buyers, as defined in Rule 144A of the Securities Act.

What will Z do with the money?

The company has retained the right to determine the interest rate, conversion rate, and other terms of the Convertible Notes at the time of pricing of the offering.

With the capital raised, Zillow Group has indicated their intention to utilize a portion of the net proceeds towards their general corporate purposes, including capped call transactions related to this offering. Among these general corporate purposes, Zillow Group identified a possible repurchase of Convertible Senior Notes due 2020 of Trulia, which is a wholly owned subsidiary of the Zillow Group.

Based in Seattle, The Zillow Group contains such familiar brands as Zillow, Trulia, and StreetEasy, working directly with real estate professionals, such as agents and rental professionals, along with lenders to maximize contacts with potentially millions of customers. They also maintain a focus on maintaining real-estate service and support brands such as Mortech, dotloop, Bridge Interactive, and Retsly.

In after-hours trading, both the A and C classes of The Zillow Group stock were trading slightly lower on the announcement.

#ZillowDollarz

Roger is a Staff Writer at The Real Daily and holds two Master's degrees, one in Education Leadership and another in Leadership Studies. In his spare time away from researching leadership retention and communication styles, he loves to watch baseball, especially the Red Sox!

Real Estate Corporate

Discount stores are banking on the bad days of underclasses

(CORPORATE NEWS) Despite brick and mortars closing, discount stores seem to be doing well. But that success seems to be at the expense of the downtrodden.

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Few sights are as ubiquitous in rural America as the simple yellow and black logo of Dollar General, and this is not going to change any time soon.

In a signal of the times, Dollar General’s marketing executive Jim Thorpe said that Dollar General’s best customer was the low income, government assistance recipient.

By the fact that Dollar General’s expansion strategy is to create more stores in small towns and cities, that’s a signal to many that the business world is not expecting incomes to rise in the heartland of the United States.

“Essentially what the dollar stores are betting on in a large way is that we are going to have a permanent underclass in America,” Garrick Brown, director for retail research at the commercial real estate company Cushman & Wakefield was quoted saying.

“It’s based on the concept that the jobs went away, and the jobs are never coming back, and that things aren’t going to get better in any of these places.”

Rival discount stores Dollar Tree Inc. and Family Dollar (also owned by Dollar Tree) are also operating out of the same principles to give Dollar General a run for their money.

While they do not enjoy as much market share as Dollar General, these discount stores are also trying to compete for the stretched dollar of the $35,000 salary household. These same households may find it difficult to travel out of their town to do their grocery shopping due to the cost of gas.

Dollar General, in its confidence of a permanent lower class in America, is also alleviating the problem of food deserts.

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), food deserts are areas that lack access to affordable fruits, vegetables, whole grains, low-fat milk, and other foods that make up the full range of a healthy diet.

Dollar General, while not having a full and robust grocery section with many fresh fruits, are offering more than what one can get in a gas station for certain and are alleviating the lack of affordable, moderately healthy options.

With U.S. income inequality still on the rise, Dollar General’s market share is not going anywhere, and the discount store chain might just become the next small-town staple in rural America.

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Real Estate Corporate

To reinvent leasing, Airbnb is creating branded apartments

(CORPORATE NEWS) Airbnb originally set out to disrupt the leasing world but has decided now to just reinvent it.

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Airbnb doesn’t like being thought of as your friendly neighborhood disruptor and has found a new alternative to the more traditional rented house/apartment/room (or castle, a tiny house, treehouse, converted barn loft, etc…): branded apartment complexes.

San Francisco based home-sharing partner group Airbnb has formed a partnership with Newgard Development Group (known as “Niido Powered by Airbnb”) to create the space-sharing concept, which will be comprised of 324 units, starting with Kissimmee, FL (just south of Orlando) and is slated to be available for move-in sometime in 2018.

The units will have amenities of a hotel such as keyless entry and an app that will allow tenants to check-in remotely. On-demand cleaning and luggage services will also be available, making the process much more streamlined for both guests and tenants.

Upon signing an annual lease, residents may rent out their apartments through Airbnb for up to 180 days, and thus must of course, remain as full-time residents for at least half of the year.

This should help to cut down on issues where landlords were replacing tenants’ leases and rental agreements with a full-time Airbnb gig.

The setup of the branded apartment complex encourages home sharing, and offers a communal environment in which all neighbors are either hosts, or guests.

Okay, so while it kind of sounds like a hotel rather than an apartment, (a timeshare, even) Airbnb does still want to keep that “hominess” aspect that defines the brand, intact. It’s been reported that they will be providing some design assistance, though will remain hands-off in ownership interest in the building.

It’s too soon to say how lucrative a spot in one of these elusive buildings will be or how much a spot will cost, but it can’t be helped to wonder at what point does this sort of expansion stop Airbnb from being… Airbnb?

With this many parties involved, it does sort of lose its charm as being a unique travel experience people have come to expect with Airbnb. I mean, it’s not a yurt in Alaska, after all.

Expansion for the branded apartment complexes will be prioritized in Miami and the Southeast, but is expected to branch out into other cities such as Nashville, TN, Charleston, SC, and “cities in Texas.”

CEO Harvey Hernandez stated that the plan was to build over 2,000 units over the next couple years. Lookout world, The Grand Budapest Airbnbs will be hitting a city near you.

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Real Estate Corporate

KB Home exec is learning to watch his tongue the hard way

(CORPORATE NEWS) Character is what you do when no one is watching and for this KB Homes exec, it is what he said that is getting him in trouble.

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Keep the shade to yo self

Need a life lesson about keeping nasty comments to yourself? Take it from KB Home CEO Jeffrey Mezger.

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This past week, KB Home cut Mezger’s 2017 bonus by 25 percent after profane comments he made about comedian Kathy Griffin came to light.

D-list drama

Mezger, in an audio recording obtained from the security cameras on Griffin’s house, called her a list of not-safe-for-work names after she called the police on him for a noise complaint. This was reportedly one in many noise complaints that she and partner Randy Bick required police assistance over.

Since the incident was reported, Griffin and Bick have filed a restraining order against Mezger.

KB Home, an upscale builder with frequent home price tags in the millions of dollars, made a statement to the press regarding Mezger’s comments, saying the CEO had apologized for his language and that it did not “reflect who his he is or what he believes.” A spokesperson from the company also reported that a further problematic incident would trigger Mezger’s immediate dismissal.

Twenty five percent of nothing

Some who believe in the power of private industry to self regulate problematic behavior hold this action by KB Home as an additional example of the shifting tide of CEO expectations.

Consumers reported in a 2016 Stanford study that it would be appropriate for a company to fire its CEO over “morally questionable behavior” even if said behavior was not technically illegal.

Uber’s former CEO Travis Kalanick was ousted by the company last year after reports of rampant sexism in the workplace were published.

However, some have questioned if this “punishment” has any actual weight behind it, or if it is just for show. For starters, KB Home did not release any data on how much of a salary cut would be–and if it would actually affect Mezger at all. In an analysis from the Los Angeles Times, columnist Michael Hiltzick found that in addition to the lack of baseline bonus information from KB Home, that the CEO has reportedly not received a bonus since 2014. As Hiltzick points out “taking 25 percent of nothing is painless.”

Repercussions to follow

Besides the question of how much the incident will cost Mezger, a larger question looms on how this may potentially affect the KB Home bottom line. Suze Orman, a TV personality and financial advisor, has already taken to Twitter to encourage her followers to not choose KB Home to receive their business.

Long run, it is yet to be seen how much this will affect Mezger and the company he runs, but for the time being it certainly serves as a nice reminder of the adage: “if you cannot be positive, then at least be quiet.”

#KBHome

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