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Zillow says their “fix zestimates” contest predates lawsuits against Zestimate

(CORPORATE) Zillow is in the midst of a few lawsuits concerning their feature which they are concurrently holding a contest to fix.



Zillow Zestimate

Zillow contest

Last week, Zillow launched a prize contest to inspire the brightest scientific minds to compete to improve the Zestimate® home valuation algorithm.

The contest offers a $1 million dollar prize to the participant who can build the best alternative.

Timing is everything

The timing of this contest seems fortuitous for Zillow, who has been the subject of two different lawsuits this month regarding their online home value estimates, which rely on an algorithm to give an estimated home value.

Both lawsuits were brought in the state of Illinois, and both claim that Zestimates meet the legal criteria for an appraisal, and Zillow doesn’t have the licensure to publish such numbers.

Additionally, disparities between actual home prices and these estimates can create losses in value and losses of time when sellers try to move their home at a price higher than the Zestimate.


Zillow’s language around their proprietary estimate states that the tools is a starting point in determining a home’s value and is not a formal appraisal.

However, through the contest, it is clear that they are recognizing it lacks value even as a starting point to assess the value of one’s home.

It’s not hard to see why, given the aforementioned example. Zillow has yet to comment officially on the relationship between the lawsuit and the contest. If they do, don’t hold your breath for an answer other than “they aren’t” or “no comment.”

How to win

The Zestimate competition works in two rounds. In round one, which is completely open to public entry, participants will design a model to improve the Zestimate residual errors. Then, the participants whose algorithm reduces the difference between the Zestimate and the actual sales prices the most will move on to the finals.

According to information about the second round, that will include the 100-best models.

In order to claim the prize, those 100 competitors have to build an algorithm to predict the actual sales price of homes, using innovative data sources to engineer new features that will give the model an edge over other participants.

Saved by the algorithm

This competition could be a fabulous way for someone with a data science background to make a mark with their brand. More importantly, if the contest works, it looks like the days of Zestimate as a headache could be a thing of the past.


Born in Boston and raised in California, Connor arrived in Texas for college and was (lovingly) ensnared by southern hospitality and copious helpings of queso. As an SEO professional, he lives and breathes online marketing and its impact on businesses. His loves include disc-related sports, a pint of a top-notch craft beer, historical non-fiction novels, and Austin's live music scene.

Real Estate Corporate

Zillow challenges federal antitrust allegations

(CORPORATE NEWS) Zillow says they’ll “vigorously defend” themselves against allegations that Zestimates are concealed on partner brokers’ listings.



zillow zestimate lawsuit

Earlier this week, New Jersey broker, EJ MGT LLC filed a lawsuit accusing Zillow of concealing Zestimates on specific listings, implying that paying partners are given an unfair advantage in the marketplace. The suit acknowledges that Zestimates appear somewhere on all listing pages, but alleges that only certain brokerage listings do not have the Zestimate listed prominently under the listing price.

Court documents offer screenshots of listing pages with and without Zestimates as well as documentation of communication with Zillow Group staff explaining that only “certain brokers” receive “certain treatment.”

But not so fast.

Zillow points out that Zestimates simply appear on different parts of the page for different listings.

Emily Heffter, Sr. Manager of Public Relations at Zillow Group tells The Real Daily, “despite the claim in the suit, no listings on Zillow are exempt from having a Zestimate. Some listings have the Zestimate in a different place on the page.”

The lawsuit criticizes the accuracy of Zestimates, a critique the company is quite used to and typically responds by reminding people that they are not appraisals, and not always accurate across the board (some states are non-disclosure states, for example, so home sales data flows differently depending on location).

Heffter reaffirms just that, noting that “the Zestimate is not an appraisal. It’s an estimate created by a sophisticated machine-learning process, and it’s meant to be used as a starting point in determining a home’s value. Zillow is very transparent about its accuracy, and we [sic] our median error rate is about 4.5 percent.”

Typically, in times of active litigation, Zillow and other companies refrain from commenting. Not this time.

Zillow Group’s official statement: “We believe the claims in this case are without merit. The Zestimate is intended to be a starting point for determining a home’s value, which is why we provide it, for free, on more than 100 million homes across the country. As a company, we always seek to create advertising products that add value for consumers and advertisers, and we intend to vigorously defend ourselves against this lawsuit.”

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Real Estate Corporate

Zillow sued for Zestimates violating federal Antitrust laws

(CORPORATE NEWS) Zillow being sued for Zestimates is nothing new, but they’re now being accused of concealing Zestimates on “Co-Conspirator Broker” listings, violating federal Antitrust laws.



zillow group

The latest Zillow legal troubles again surround their Zestimates; this time they are being sued for their Zestimates violating federal Antitrust laws. The company has allegedly violated and continues to violate Section 1 of the Sherman Act, 15 U.S.C. § 1 and the New Jersey Antitrust Act, N.J.S.A. 56:9-3.

Plaintiff, EJ MGT LLC, based in New Jersey, filed suit against Zillow Group Inc. and Zillow Inc. today. In a 21-point legal brief outlining their specific violations, two things become immediately clear (assuming of course there is truth in these allegations): Zillow is giving preferential treatment to preferred brokerages (labeled ‘co-conspirator Broker[s] in the lawsuit) and Zestimates are wildly inaccurate (as many have adamantly stated since Zestimates’ conception).

The first few points of the brief explain exactly what Zillow is being accused of doing: “this antitrust action arises from Zillow’s conspiracy with certain real-estate brokerage companies to selectively conceal ‘Zestimates.’ ”Zillow’s estimate of a residential property’s “fair market value” which the lawsuit states they know “to be inaccurate,” have allowed “only select brokers to conceal the display of Zestimates on their listings to the exclusion of the general public.”

The lawsuit goes on to state that “these agreements between Zillow and certain co-conspirator brokers of residential real estate restrain trade (read: the agents/brokers being allowed to conceal unwanted Zestimates, henceforth referred to as ‘Co-conspirator Brokers’) and deprive Plaintiff and the public in general of the benefits of open and robust competition in two markets: the residential real estate market and the residential real estate brokerage market.”

In essence, Zillow and the Co-conspirator Brokers have allegedly made an illegal agreement regarding the display of Zestimates on Zillow’s site.

Zillow has long touted their Zestimates as a “user-friendly format to promote transparent real-estate markets and allow people to make informed decisions;” except Zestimates are often believed to be inaccurate and now they’re allegedly being concealed for a select group of Co-conspirator Brokers – a far cry from making real estate more transparent.

If the lawsuit’s claims have any validity behind them, it seems as though Zillow may be in for a bumpy ride. Item 10 in the suit states, “Zillow has acknowledged that it conceals Zestimates as a result of agreements with only ‘certain brokers’ who receive ‘certain treatment’” and uses a message screenshot from Zillow’s Help Center as proof these words were in fact used to explain why some listings had prominent Zestimates while others did not:

You may be wondering what brought about this lawsuit; Plaintiff, EJ MGT LLC, is marketing a property located in Cresskill, New Jersey, through an agent unaffiliated with Zillow (not a “Co-Conspirator Broker”). Therefore, their listing contains a prominently displayed Zestimate, while a similar listing in nearby Alpine, New Jersey, which is listed through a “Co-conspirator Broker,” conceals the Zestimate:

The above example is not the only one outlined in the case, however. Item 12 of the lawsuit states that further evidence can be seen by comparing a residence page for a property while it was listed with a Co-conspirator Broker versus the same residence page once the property was off the market. One clearly conceals the Zestimate, while the latter displays it clearly underneath the listing price.

For reference, the Co-conspirator Broker listing was captured on December 26, 2017 and the screenshot after it was taken off the market with the Zestimate was taken on January 2, 2018. Merely a week in between images, and yet the difference of how the ad is displayed is quite apparent:

In essence, Zillow has violated the very transparency they claimed to create.

Zillow is allegedly promoting misleading and inaccurate information while using their marketing power to charge brokers to hide this information which could negatively impact a sale, and which Zillow itself has acknowledged is sometimes inaccurate.

Also, general members of the public have no way to prevent Zillow from obtaining and posting information in this way, and it cannot be altered without hiring an alleged Co-conspirator Broker, as Zillow has explicitly refused to offer the option to hide information to individual homeowners, further deepening the dependency on Co-conspirator Brokers.

Because of their alleged refusal to treat everyone equally and “empower homebuyers with information,” they have potentially restrained trade in connection with the exchange of information regarding home valuation, and offered anti-competitive benefits to only those brokers chosen to purchase that ‘special’ service package from Zillow that removes Zestimates from listings.

Therefore, brokers are not on even footing: when a seller attempts to price check; the brokers without it could be losing out to those who have the ‘special’ package and removal of Zestimates alongside listing prices.

So far, each individual Co-conspirator Broker has not been named; they have been named as a group: Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc., Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC, Century 21 Real Estate LLC, The Corcoran Group ERA, and Weichert Realty, according to court documents. It is unlikely that any action would ever impact the brokerages, rather Zillow Group itself.

Zillow is being sued for five counts: two counts of conspiracy to restrain trade, one count of violating the New Jersey Consumer Fraud Act, one count of slander of title/product disparagement, and one count of interference with prospective economic advantage. A jury trial has been requested.

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Real Estate Corporate

How big box stores are stalling Whole Foods expansions using leasing contracts

(CORPORATE NEWS) As Amazon begins its Whole Foods expansions, other big box competitors are trying to put the wabash on them using their leasing contracts.



whole foods

Over the summer it was made known that Amazon was buying Whole Foods then a few months later we learned that the new owners were revamping store pricing and poaching competitor’s customers.

Despite only having 450 locations, Whole Foods is slowly turning the supermarket market in their favor. However, some of the older, bigger players aren’t having it and have figured out that they can use their own real estate contracts to level the field with Whole Foods.

Apparently it is common practice for bigger retailers in commercial real estate to sign leases with conditions that prevent their landlord from renting to other businesses that would create competition.

For instance if a Starbucks is renting in one location they might include a term that says no other coffee shop can be adjacent so if an Dunkin’ Donuts wanted in next door they couldn’t.

For Whole Foods that means because they are now selling Amazon electronics like Echos or AmazonFire TV, their usually docile neighbor Best Buy could go track down the fine print of their leasing contract and forbid Whole Foods from selling those products.

It’s like they always say — All is fair in love in retail. Well, you know what I mean.

If we’re being honest an Amazon + Whole Foods team is pretty enticing. It makes a whole lot of sense that other retailers that can only offer half of that package would resort to any means necessary to impede their progress.

Even Target is getting in on the defense reportedly not allowing Amazon Lockers to be installed. I get it, you want people there to shop at your store, not to pick up merch they bought elsewhere.

Granted with Target’s new collaborations with companies like Brit + Co, May Designs and Magnolia Market, I doubt they have too much to worry about.

At any rate, this sort of fine-print legalese defense seems like a pretty large indicator that other retailers are feeling the heat from this merger.

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