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Real Estate Big Data

Is your MLS on the RESO naughty list?

(REAL ESTATE DATA) A lot has changed in the real estate industry at the MLS level, but if your MLS or Association is on the RESO naughty list, it may be time to say something so you’re not impacted negatively.

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RESO

Heaps and heaps of data

At the core of what makes up the real estate practice is sales, negotiation, marketing, and data. The last bit often eludes not only agents, but brokers, and to be frank, the industry as a whole.

We’re sitting on massive amounts of data, endless points of historical information that come together like glorious Legos to build the most beautiful giant city of castles you’ve ever seen.

But Legos aren’t exactly concrete or marble, so the industry has come together (including brokers volunteering time) to improve this mass of data we’re all sitting on, and the MLS is the first point of contact for all of this data and info. Years ago, the “Real Estate Standards Organization” (RESO) was established to organize and standardize this wealth of data.

Problem solved, right?

False, there’s still a problem

Nope. There are still an embarrassing number of multiple listing services and real estate boards that aren’t RESO certified, meaning their mountain of data could be sloppy, disorganized, useless in many cases.

There is a running naughty list of AORs/MLSs that aren’t RESO certified (see below), and if you belong to one of them, it is worth making a call to ask what their plans are to obtain certification and adhere to the industry standards so the data isn’t as weak as a 100-story Lego house.

AORs/MLSs Not RESO Data Dictionary Certified:
Altamaha Board of REALTORS®, Inc.
Bay County REALTOR® Association
Beckley Board of REALTORS®
Big Bear Assocation of Realtors
Brooklyn New York MLS (Broker-Owned Non-N.A.R. Affiliated)
Buffalo Trace MLS
Capital Region Multiple Listing Service
Central Coast Regional MLS (CCRMLS)
Columbus Georgia Board of REALTORS
Covington County Association of REALTORS
Cushing Board of REALTORS®
Dan River Region Board of REALTORS
Dublin Board of REALTORS, Inc.
Eastern Arkansas Realtors Association
Eastern Kentucky Association of Realtors
Eastern Shore Board of REALTORS
Fayette-Nicholas Board of REALTORS®
Four County Board of REALTORS®
GREENBRIER VALLEY BOARD OF REALTORS
Garden City Board of Realtors
Grand Island Board of REALTORS
Greater Hazleton Association Of Realtors
Greenville Area Board of REALTORS
Hays Board of Realtors
Heartland Assocation of Realtors Inc
Henderson County Board of REALTORS
Iron County Board of REALTORS®
Jamestown Board of REALTORS®
Kansas Association of Realtors (Kansas Statewide)
Key West Association of Realtors
Lexington-Bluegrass Assn of Realtors
Lynchburg Association of REALTORS
Martinsville, Henry & Patrick Counties Association of REALTORS
McDowell Board of REALTORS
Memphis Area Association Of Realtors® Inc
Midlands Board of Realtors
Midlands MLS Inc.
Milledgeville MLS
Mitchell Board of REALTORS®
Nebraska Realtors Outstate (NRA)
Norfolk Board Of Realtors (NRA)
Okeechobee County Board of Realtors
Otsego-Delaware Board of REALTORS
Phenix City Board of REALTORS
Pike County Board of REALTORS
Pittsburg Board of REALTORS
Plainview Association of REALTORS®
Rockingham County Association of REALTORS
Royal Palm Coast Realtor Association
Russellville Board of Realtors
Salina MLS
Sheridan County Board of REALTORS
South Central Association of REALTORS
Southeast Georgia MLS
Southeast Kansas MLS
Southern Midlands Board of REALTORS
Southern Piedmont Land & Lake Assn of Realtors
Southwest Kansas MLS
Southwest Mississippi Board of REALTORS, Inc.
Tehachapi Area Association of REALTORS
Tennessee Valley Association of REALTORS
Tulare County Association of REALTORS®
Upper Cumberland Association of REALTORS
Williston Board of REALTORS®
Wiregrass Board of REALTORS®
Yancy Mitchell County Board of Realtors North Carolina

AORs/MLSs Not RESO Web API Certified
Altamaha Board of REALTORS®, Inc.
Americus Board of REALTORS
Ann Arbor Area Board of REALTORS
Ashland Board of Realtors
Bakersfield Association of REALTORS
Bay Area Real Estate Information Services
Bay County REALTOR® Association
Beckley Board of REALTORS®
Benton County Multiple Listing Service
Big Bear Association of Realtors
Boone County Board of REALTORS
Brooklyn New York MLS (Broker-Owned Non-N.A.R. Affiliated)
Buffalo Trace MLS
California Desert Association of REALTORS
Central Oregon Association of Realtors
Central Penn Multi-List
Cincinnati Area Board of REALTORS
Clear Lake Board of REALTORS
Columbia Greene Northern Dutchess
Columbus Georgia Board of REALTORS
Covington County Association of REALTORS
Crisp Area Board of Realtors, Inc.
Cushing Board of REALTORS®
Dan River Region Board of REALTORS
Dublin Board of REALTORS, Inc.
East Central Association of REALTORS
Eastern Arkansas Realtors Association
Eastern Kentucky Association of Realtors
Eastern Shore Board of REALTORS
Emporia Board of REALTORS
Fayette-Nicholas Board of REALTORS®
Firelands Association of REALTORS
Flint Hills Board of REALTORS
Four County Board of REALTORS®
Fresno Association of REALTORS
GREENBRIER VALLEY BOARD OF REALTORS
Garden City Board of Realtors
Goodland Board of REALTORS
Grand Island Board of REALTORS
Greater Hazleton Association Of Realtors
Greater Northwest Indiana Association of REALTORS
Greater Portsmouth Area Board of Realtors
Greenville Area Board of REALTORS
Hays Board of Realtors
Heart of Iowa Board of REALTORS®, Inc.
Henderson County Board of REALTORS
High Desert Association of REALTORS
Highlands-Cashiers Multiple Listing Service, Inc.
Humboldt Assoc. of REALTORS, Inc.
Huntingdon County Board of REALTORS
Internet-Technology Pasadena-Foothill
Iowa Statewide
Iron County Board of REALTORS®
Jamestown Board of REALTORS®
Kansas Association of Realtors (Kansas Statewide)
Key West Association of Realtors
Kings County Board of REALTORS
Lexington-Bluegrass Association of REALTORS
Lubbock Asssocation of REALTORS
Lynchburg Association of REALTORS
Madisonville Hopkins County Board of REALTORS
Marshalltown Board of REALTORS
Martinsville, Henry & Patrick Counties Association of REALTORS
McDowell Board of REALTORS
McKean County Association of Realtors
Midlands Board of Realtors
Milledgeville MLS
Mitchell Board of REALTORS®
Monroe County Board of Realtors
Moultrie Board of Realtors
Nevada County Association of REALTORS
Newton Board of REALTORS
North Central Board Of Realtors – Ponca
North Central Iowa Board of REALTORS
Northwest Iowa MLS
Ojai Valley Board of REALTORS
Otsego-Delaware Board of REALTORS
Phenix City Board of REALTORS
Pike County Board of REALTORS
Pittsburg Board of REALTORS
Plainview Association of REALTORS®
Plymouth County Board of REALTORS
Poweshiek County MLS
REALTORS Association of Lincoln (Midlands MLS)
Rockingham County Association of REALTORS
Royal Palm Coast Realtor Association
Russellville Board of Realtors
Salina MLS
San Francisco Association of REALTORS
Sheridan County Board of REALTORS
Snake River Regional Multiple Listing Service
Somerset-Lake Cumberland Board of REALTORS
South Central Association of REALTORS
South Tahoe Association of REALTORS, Inc.
Southeast Georgia MLS
Southeast Iowa Regional MLS
Southeast Kansas MLS
Southern Indiana REALTORS® Association
Southern Midlands Board of REALTORS
Southern Oregon Multiple Listing Service
Southern Piedmont Land & Lake Assn of Realtors
Southwest Georgia Board of Realtors MLS
Southwest Kansas MLS
Southwest Mississippi Board of REALTORS, Inc.
Storm Lake Multiple Listing Service
Tama County Board of REALTORS
Tehachapi Area Association of REALTORS
Tennessee Valley Association of REALTORS
Tulare County Association of REALTORS
Upper Cumberland Association of REALTORS
Vail Board of REALTORS
Valdosta Board of REALTORS/South Georgia MLS
Webster City MLS
West Central Iowa Regional MLS
Western Steuben Allegany Association of Realtors, Inc.
Williston Board of REALTORS®
Wiregrass Board of REALTORS®
Yancy Mitchell County Board of Realtors North Carolina

If you didn’t know, now you know

RESO says their organization “develops, promotes and maintains, through an open process, voluntary electronic commerce standards for the real estate industry. As a standards setting organization involving the participation of competitors, RESO is committed to full compliance with all laws and regulations and to maintaining the highest ethical standards in the way it conducts its operations and activities.”

If you belong to one of the aforementioned AORs/MLSs, perhaps it is time for you to get involved and volunteer alongside the hundreds of other volunteers that keep RESO running smoothly nationwide.

#RESOnaughtylist

Lani is the Chief Operating Officer at The Real Daily and sister news outlet, The American Genius, and has been named in the Inman 100 Most Influential Real Estate Leaders several times, co-authored a book, co-founded BASHH and Austin Digital Jobs, and is a seasoned business writer and editorialist with a penchant for the irreverent.

Real Estate Big Data

Housing optimism cools – what will it take to heat back up?

(REAL ESTATE NEWS) Despite economic gains and a hot housing market, optimism is cooling. Why is this happening and what’s the cure?

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fair home prices existing home sales housing

Housing is a complex creature – the market can be on fire, but optimism can wane nonetheless. The National Association of Realtors (NAR) is reporting that despite solid job creation, the strength of the economy, and increased economic growth, many households are less keen on believing now is a good time for buying or selling, and are overall less confident about the economy.

This comes as a result of the fourth quarter HOME (Housing Opportunities and Market Experience) survey, which samples US households by a random digit-dial and was conducted by TehcnoMetrica Market Intelligence that gathered 2,705 households. The HOME survey collects data on a monthly basis and is focused on identifying real estate trends.

Despite an improving economy, more hiring, and low mortgage rates, optimism in home sales was not as expected, according to Lawrence Yun, Chief Economist for the NAR.

In general, most prospective home buyers had to deal with a lack of inventory – less construction, fewer sellers, and a lack of affordability.

Reduced economic confidence in the face of the economy’s improvements persisted, with more households feeling less secure about their financial situation, and less people believing the economy is improving. Simply put – they aren’t feeling it.

Renters are less engaged to buy, as demonstrated by a two percent decrease in renters believing now is a good time to go get that home.

Overall – the people most excited to purchase homes are current homeowners, households with income above $100,000, and those living in the Midwest and South. If you live in the West, it is likely that you believe yourself to be in a good market for selling a home.

Overall, people more firmly believe it is a good time to sell their home over last year, which can spell some good news for potential buyers in 2018, as more people may be comfortable putting their homes on the market.

The key is that housing supply must increase. New builds and more sellers placing homes on the market will improve confidence about the housing supply and can work in tandem with a better job market and improved economy to make households feel more optimistic about their #future.

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Real Estate Big Data

Are people jumping back on the flipping bandwagon?

(REAL ESTATE NEWS) House flipping is fun to watch on tv, but the housing crash ended the big wave of investor flips – is it that time again?

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flipping houses

Just when you thought all those shows about flipping houses on HGTV were going to be obsolete, the entity behind the nation’s largest property database, ATTOM Data Solutions, drops news that home flipping may be on the rise in emerging markets.

ATTOM’s Q3 2017 U.S. Home Flipping Report found that there was an influx of flipping and market competition in 44 out of the 93 metropolitan markets.

“A more than nine-year low in the ratio of flips per investor is evidence of this increased competition,” Daren Blomquist, senior vice president at ATTOM Data Solutions, said at the release of the report on Thursday. “[This] is pushing many investors to new metro areas that often have weaker market fundamentals but also come with a bigger supply of discounted distressed properties to flip.”

In order to perform the statistical analysis included in the report, ATTOM maintained its analytical definition of flipping from previous years. The property data firm defines a flipped home as a property “sold in an arms-length sale for the second time within a 12-month period based on publicly recorded sales deed data” that was collected by their research firm.

Areas with the largest revitalized interest for flippers: Baton Rouge, Louisiana (up 140 percent); Winston-Salem, North Carolina (up 58 percent); Salem, Oregon (up 51 percent); Indianapolis, Indiana (up 51 percent); and Buffalo, New York (up 47 percent).

However, this flipping increase of 47 percent of markets is bucking the national trend of shifting away from flipping. Nationally, the report finds that while from Q3 to Q2, the rate of home flipping has decreased 0.5 percent, the overall home flip rate comparing Q3 2016 to Q3 2017 has stagnated at 5.1 percent. Also, return on investment (ROI) is decreasing, which might be driving this declining rate.

As detailed in the report, only 37 percent of major metropolitan markets are experiencing an increase of average gross home flipping return on investment (ROI) in Q3. The rest of markets? They’re experiencing an ROI downturn, receiving lowest average gross flipping ROI since Q2 2015.

“Home flipping profits continue to be squeezed by a dwindling inventory of distressed properties available to purchase at a discount and increasing competition from fair-weather home flippers often willing to operate on thinner margins,” Blomquist said.

It looks like we shouldn’t count out the creation of “Flip this House: Baton Rouge” coming soon to a TV near you.

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Real Estate Big Data

The average first time home buyer struggles with debt and down payments

(REAL ESTATE NEWS) For years, the first time home buyer has been squeezed out of the market, but for those qualifying, what are the traits of today’s average first timer?

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first time home buyer young couple renting divorce

While the nation’s housing supply tightens and home prices continue to rise, first time home buyers are also struggling to save enough for a down payment while burdened with student loan debt.

As a result, only 34 percent of 2017 home buyers were first time homeowners, a minor decrease from 35 percent in 2016, according to the National Association of Realtors 2017 Profile of Home Buyers and Sellers. This figure continues to fall away from the long-term historical market average of 39 percent, per the NAR.

The typical first time home buyer? A 32-year-old with an average household income of $75,000 who carries some lingering student loan debt.

While millennials are in their prime home buying years, the NAR found debt and saving for a down payment are the most significant home buying hurdles. A quarter (25 percent) of new first time buyers said saving for a down payment was the most difficult task they faced during the process and more than half (55 percent) said student loan debt delayed their home purchase.

Among the surveyed home buying newbies, 41 percent indicated they have student loan debt, which is up from the 40 percent recorded in 2016. And, the average debt balance has increased even more in the past year, reaching an average of $29,000 compared to $26,000 in 2016. More than half of debt-carrying buyers owe at least $25,000, too.

The typical first time home? A single-family home in a suburban area with a median purchase price of $190,000. And, as saving for a down payment is difficult for many young buyers, the average first time home buyer down payment averaged 5 percent in 2017, the lowest percentage recorded by the NAR since 2013. The average down payment figure also indicates such buyers finance nearly 10 percent more (95 percent) of their home purchases than repeat buyers (86 percent).

In addition to personal finance burdens, first time buyers have struggled to find affordable options as the housing inventory in many parts of the U.S. tightens and prices increase for what is available. When buyers are on a budget and balancing debt, this can dampen the dreams of homeownership and prolong the time spent searching for their first home. Overall, the 2017 NAR survey found the average home buying search lasts 10 weeks.

Regardless of reality, many currently believe that it’s just too expensive to buy.

“With the lower end of the market seeing the worst of the supply crunch, house hunters faced mounting odds in finding their first home,” said NAR chief economist Lawrence Yun. “Multiple offers were a common occurrence, investors paying in cash had the upper hand, and prices kept climbing, which yanked homeownership out of reach for countless would-be buyers.”

The NAR annual Profile of Buyers and Sellers survey is survey data-based snapshot of home buyers who have purchased a home in the past 12 months, which, for the latest report, meant between July 2016 and June 2017.

While the new first time home buyer stats may not be the most promising, these findings can help real estate professionals better understand the current housing market and better assist home buyers – especially younger buyers who may benefit from more guidance.

first time home buyer

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